2018

The winner of the 2018 Educational Writers' Award was Cath Senker for her book Far From Home (Franklin Watts).

The 2018 Award focused on books for 11-18 year olds, published in 2016 and 2017. This years judges were Philip Arkinstall, a curriculum leader for History in a Wiltshire secondary school; Elspeth Graham, a prolific author of both fiction and non-fiction for children; and Océane Toffoli, a senior school librarian and Vice-chair of CILIP YLG London.

The judges were full of praise for the winning title, saying:

This heart-breaking, powerful and very special book takes a thoughtful and relevant look at a subject we all need to understand and care about. It fully utilises every page, from the maps on the inside covers to the timeline, glossary and further reading section and is extremely readable and accessible for its secondary school audience. Never giving in to media stereotypes, it also provides a clear and compassionate catalyst for discussions about the plight of refugees, highlighting individual experiences and presenting different viewpoints in an impeccably non-judgmental way.

The 2018 shortlistees were:

  • Loos Save Lives by Seren Boyd (Wayland)
  • How to Think Like a Coder by Jim Christian and illustrated by Paul Boston (Batsford)
  • From Prejudice to Pride by Amy Lamé (Wayland)
  • The Story of Painting written and illustrated by Mick Manning and Brita Granström (Franklin Watts)

 

2017

The winners of the 2017 Educational Writers’ Award were Wojciech Grajkowski, illustrator Piotr Socha, and translator Agnes Monod-Gayraud for their bookThe Book of Bees (Thames & Hudson).

The 2017 Award focused on books for 5-11 year olds, published in 2015 and 2016. This year's judges were school librarian Marion Le Lannou; headteacher Mike Reeves; and writer, editor, and publisher Annemarie Young. 

The judges were full of praise for the book, saying:

A wonderfully imagined and wittily illustrated compendium of information all about bees their central role in our world, which pitches contrasting elements together in just the way that children love. Full of humour, it takes in the ancient Greeks and Egyptians, entomology, botany, the Bible, design, technology and more, breaking the subject of bees out of its traditional confines. Everything is beautifully explained in detail on a double-page spread for a deeper understanding. Quite magnificent.

The 2017 shortlistees were:

  • Secrets of the Sea (Big Picture Press/Templar) by Kate Baker and illustrated by Eleanor Taylor 
  • Fluttering Minibeast Adventures (Red Shed/Egmont) by Jess French and illustrated by Jonathan Woodward, with paper engineering by Keith Finch
  • Genius! The Most Astonishing Adventures of All Time (Thames & Hudson) by Deborah Kespert and designed by Karen Wilks
  • How to Code in 10 Easy Lessons (QED Publishing/Quarto) by Sean McManus and illustrated by Venitia Dean
  • Tree of Wonder: The Many Marvelous Lives of a Rainforest Tree (Chronicle Books) by Kate Messner and illustrated by Simona Mulazzani

 

2016

The winners of the 2016 ALCS Award were Anna Weltman and illustrators Edward Cheverton and Ivan Hissey for their book This is Not a Maths Book (Ivy Press).

The 2016 Award focused on books for 11-18 year olds, published in 2014 and 2015. This year’s judges were author Nicola Morgan; teacher Jonathan Lomas; and librarian Nicky Ransley.

Weltman, Cheverton and Hissey beat an outstanding shortlist of non-fiction titles. Nicola Morgan praised the book, saying:

I particularly loved that this book would be likely to engage people of any level of mathematical aptitude or reluctance and yet it did so without jumping up and down and shoving a 'maths is fun' message at us. It was genuinely pleasurable and mind-opening and you can't ask more of a book!

The 2016 shortlist were:

  • The Oxford Shakespeare Dictionary (Oxford University Press) by David and Ben Crystal and illustrated by Kate Bellamy
  • The School of Art (Wide Eyed Editions) by Teal Triggs illustrated by Daniel Frost

 

2015

The winners of the 2015 ALCS Award were Rachel Williams and illustrator Lucy Letherland for their book Atlas of Adventures (Wide Eyed Editions, Aurum Press). 

The 2015 Award focused on books for 5-11 year olds, published in 2013 and 2014. This year’s judges were school librarian Caroline Gosden; headteacher Michael Schumm; and author Cath Senker.

Williams and Letherland beat an outstanding shortlist of non-fiction titles exploring subjects ranging from animal food chains and space to the First World War and maths. Atlas of Adventures (Wide Eyed Editions) follows a boy and girl as they visit over 30 destinations across seven continents. The judges praised the book, saying:

This is a beautifully designed, durable and hugely informative book, packed full of vibrant colour, and fascinating information and activities from countries around the world. Offering an experience not found on the internet, its roller coaster ride of a journey will encourage children across the primary school age groups to find out more about the world we live in.

The 2015 shortlist were:

  • Who Eats Who (Oxford University Press) by Teresa Heapy illustrated by Rebecca Elliot 
  • Marvellous Maths (Templar) by Jonathan Litton illustrated by Thomas Flintham 
  • Dear Jelly: Family Letters From the First World War (Frankling Watts) by Sarah Ridley

  • Space Record Breakers (Carlton Kids) by Anne Rooney

 

2014 

The winners of the 2014 ALCS Award were John Richards and Ed Simkins for the world in infographics: ANIMAL KINGDOM (Wayland). Described as 'an outstanding book to engage any reader in this Information Age. More information is packed into its vivid, colourful pages than looks possible, all presented through brilliant, easy-to-read infographics. The whole book jumps out at you and id thoroughly engaging and informative.'

The 2014 Award focused on books published during 2012 and 2013 for the 11-18 age group, and the shortlist for this year's Award was comprised of three strong titles. They were: 

  • Keep Your Cool: How to deal with Life's Worries and Stresses Dr. Aaron Balick and illustrator Clotilde Syzmanski (Franklin Watts)
  • The Danger Zone: Avoid Being Sir Isaac Newton! Ian Graham and illustrator David Antram (Book House)
  • Mission: Explore FOOD Daniel Raven-EllisonHelen Steer and Tom Morgan-Jones (Can of Worms)

 

2013 

Writer Tom Adams and illustrator Thomas Flintham were announced as the winners of the 2013 ALCS Educational Writers' Award, for Molecule Mayhem! Pop-Up Chemistry Chaos. Described as a "fun and engaging book...a worthy winner" by the prize judges, Molecule Mayhem!  investigates such chemical conundrums as where petrol comes from; why onions make us cry; how fireworks work and what on earth a nanotube is.

The 2013 Award focused on books published during 2011 and 2012 for the 5-11 age group, and the shortlist for this year's Award was comprised of three strong titles. They were: 

  • World Atlas Nick Crane and David Dean (Barefoot Books)
  • How The Weather Works: A Hands-On Guide To Our Changing Skies and Climate Christine Dorian and Beverley Young (Templar)
  • The Danger Zone: Avoid Working on a Medieval Cathedral! Fiona Macdonald and David Antram (Book House)

2012 

Described as “unforgettable”, Ruth Thomson was announced as the winner of the 2012 ALCS Educational Writers’ Award for Terezín: A Story of the Holocaust. The judges described the winner as: “One of the finest children’s non-fiction books for many years”.

The 2012 Award focused on books for 12-18 year olds, published in 2010 and 2011. Terezín beat off strong competition from the other three titles shortlisted for this year’s Award. They were:

  • Really Really Big Questions about Faith Dr Julian Baggini (Kingfisher)
  • The Story of Britain Patrick Dillon (Walker Books)
  • Into the Unknown: how great explorers found their way by land sea and air Stewart Ross(Walker Books)

Download the press release

 

2011

The winner of the 2011 Award for the 5-11 age group, was Stewart Ross for Moon: Apollo 11 and Beyond...The Ultimate Guide to Our Nearest Neighbour (OUP).

The shortlist also comprised:

  • Nick Baker's Bug Zoo by Nick Baker (Dorling Kindersley)
  • Gorilla Journal by Carolyn Franklin (Salariya Book Company)
  • Mission Explore by The Geography Collective (Can of Worms Press)

The 2011 judging panel comprised: children’s writer Nicola Davies, teacher Chris Freudenberg and librarian Fiona Kirk.

 

2010

The winner of the 2010 Award, for the 12-18 age group, was Bill Bryson for A Really Short History of Nearly Everything (Doubleday), which was abridged and edited by Felicia Law (Diverta Ltd.) with whom he shared the Award.

The 2010 shortlist also comprised:

  • Shakespeare on Toast by Ben Crystal (Icon Books)
  • Do You Think You’re Clever? by John Farndon (Icon Books)
  • A Slice of Pi by Liz Strachan, illustrated by Steven Appleby (Constable)

The 2010 judging panel included three educational experts: school librarian Maggie Campbell, teacher Louise Gerrard and writer Stewart Ross.

 

2009

  • The 2009 Award - for the 5-11 age group - was won by the ‘disgustingly good’ Gooey, Chewy, Rumble, Plop Book by Steve Alton, Nick Sharratt and Sally Symes (Bodley Head), seeing off strong competition.

The four other shortlisted titles were:

  • How to Make Manga Characters by Katy Coope (Collins Big Cat)
  • Chocolate – The Bean that Conquered the World by Vivian French, ill. Paul Howard (Walker)
  • Tail-End Charlie by Mick Manning & Brita Granström (Frances Lincoln)
  • Archie’s War – My Scrapbook of the First World War by Marcia Williams (Walker)

 

2008

  • The winner of the inaugural Educational Writers' Award was Ian Gilbert for The Little Book of Thunks: 260 Questions to Make your Brain Go Ouch! (Crown House Publishing).

The three other shortlisted titles were:

  • Simon Basher & Adrian Dingle for The Periodic Table – Elements with Style! (Kingfisher)
  • Tish Farrell for Write Your Own Adventure Stories (Ticktock Media)
  • Glenn Murphy for Why Is Snot Green? (Macmillan)

The judges also commended Meg Harper's Wha'ever published by The Spinal Injuries Association.